Heart and Small Intestine Meridians

Heart Meridian Chart by Wellbrocks

Heart peak time is 11 am to 1 pm – Small intestine is 1 pm to 3 pm
Associated color: red – Season most active: summer
Negative emotions: heart- anxious, overly excited
Small intestine- uncertainty, lost
Positive emotion: heart- peaceful
Small intestine- confidence
Essential Oils: heart- lavender
Small intestine- tangerine, marjoram

 

Heart Meridian

Heart Meridian Chart by WellbrocksThe heart meridian, containing nine points, travels down from under the armpit area to the inside of the little finger.

  • HT 2 Pain in the elbow or shoulder, poor circulation
  • HT 4-6 Wrist pain, anxiety, chest pain from stress
  • HT 9 Heart issues, finger pain

Follow the enlarged chart for finding these points on your body. After locating a point, press on it a bit. Is it tender or sore? Do you have any of the conditions associated with this point? Place a PowerStrip over the area needing energy.

Small Intestine

The small intestine meridian begins at the outside tip of the little finger traveling to the cheek area. You may view these points on the enlarged chart.

  • SI 1 Beginning of meridian energy, finger pain
  • SI 6 Wrist pain,stiffness in hand and lower arm, fatigueSmall Intestine Meridian Chart by Wellbrocks
  • SI 7 Elbow pain, achy joints, stress, swelling
  • SI 11-13 Place over scapula for shoulder and arm pain
  • SI 14-15 Neck and shoulder stiffness and pain
  • SI 18-19 Ear issues, facial nerve pain, TMJ,  upper level toothache

Heart Function

The heart is a rhythmic pump which routes blood from the veins to the lungs through the pulmonary artery. After blood picks up more oxygen, the aorta pumps this oxygen-rich blood throughout the body. On average, this cycle repeats 70-80 times per minute. This adds up to over 4,000 beats per hour. Each day your heart beats over 100,000 times!

Under stress and anxiety, the heart rate goes even higher than this incredible amount. And if not kept under control, stress contributes to cardiovascular disorders. Monitoring your blood pressure is an excellent sign of the condition and strength of the heart muscle and circulatory system.

Small Intestine Function

The small intestine is the location where nutrients are absorbed into the blood stream. Proteolytic enzymes are secreted from the pancreas and bile is secreted from the gallbladder into the small intestine for digesting proteins, starches, and fats. The small intestine is about 20 feet long, but smaller in diameter compared to the large intestine, which is about 5 feet long.

What Stresses the Heart and Small Intestines?

Hypertension may result from excessive emotional stress at home or in the workplace. The body’s response to stress might be a stomach ache, headache, or backache. Stress ultimately steals energy and may even lead to sleeplessness. This in turn leads to crankiness, absent-mindedness, and perhaps a temper flare that could get out of control. When it gets to this level the heart rate increases from adrenaline pumping throughout the body. When adrenaline remains in the body for an extended time, blood pressure (hypertension) becomes a health issue.

Poor diet is one of the top stressors for the small intestine. Eating too much cooked, overly processed, and sweet foods robs the body of necessary nutrients for maintaining energy and strength.

How Can I Support the Heart and Small Intestines?

Managing emotions is the most important step in keeping heart energy strong. Second to this is hydration. A dehydrated body has a difficult time maintaining good circulation to the hands, feet, and brain, all being extremities. Under a crisis, blood flow remains in the core of the body. Cold hands and feet are signs of poor circulation, so stay active for good circulation.

To keep the small intestine energy strong, avoid eating allergenic foods: wheat, dairy, soy, corn, sugar, chocolate, etc. Eat an abundance of fresh raw produce that is organically grown. Chew food well and if there is difficulty with gas and indigestion consider taking digestive support.

To view a comprehensive chart with all organ correlations click here.

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Written by: wellbrock | | Categorized: Frequency | Tagged: Tags:

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